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10 Customer Service Skills You Need to Know by Matthew Olszewski

A few decades ago  customer service was just a department within an organization. Today, that has all changed. Previously, if someone wanted to make a career in a company, they most often would choose marketing or sales. Today, the situation is different. Due to high competition in any industry, it’s increasingly difficult to find new customers. Companies that want to survive on the market must try to find regular customers. Even for small entrepreneurs who saw the opportunity for additional earnings, they understood the importance of caring for their  customers. Today, customers have greater choices and are more demanding than ever before. Therefore, taking care of customers can give you an edge over your competition.

To win customer's trust you must have the appropriate knowledge and skills. Of course, the knowledge contained on this infographics is good at the beginning. If you are serious about your business then you should be more broadly interested in this topic.  There are many books and courses on customer service skills on the market today, you will definitely find something that will help you develop your business in this area. Excellent customer service needs to become one of the main pillars of your business.

Something about Matthew Olszewski.

I'm the owner of www.mattsfactor.com blog. My interests are related to personal development and business. I became interested in things associated with entrepreneurship, becouse a lot of satisfaction gives me creating business strategies and their implementation. Makes me fun to experiment with new solutions that I can use in my business.

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3 Ways To Find Valuable Customer Experience Insight by Jeremy Watkin

I’m 6’4” tall so I don’t typically spend much time riding in the back seat of cars–especially not in my own car. We had family in town this past weekend so I answered the call and sat in my back seat quite possibly for the first time ever. When I sat down, I adjusted the floor mat and found the tiny USB plug for my headphones that went missing quite a while ago. It had fallen out of my pocket and I assumed it was gone forever.

Isn’t it funny how simply changing my seat resulted in finding what I was searching for? Business insights are a lot like my missing USB plug. Sometimes a change of seat or speaking with those in other seats within your organization will give you new eyes to see problems and solutions you previously believed were nonexistent.

Voice Of Customer (VOC) is all the rage right now for companies interested in improving the experience for their customers. Before you spend many thousands of dollars on a VOC solution, allow me to offer a few ideas to kickstart your program.

Get To Know The People On The Front Lines

Housed within your contact center is a wealth of knowledge and information about what is and isn’t working about your product or service. Whether you periodically speak with customers or speak with the people speaking with your customers, create open lines of communication so they are comfortable sharing the challenges and complaints they regularly face. You may find that there’s a simple, inexpensive improvement that can pay big dividends for your customer experience.

Get People In All Different Seats Talking To Each Other

You may not realize it but many people within your organization have an impact on your customer experience. Sales and marketing work to get customers in the door and signed up, management creates policies that affect customers, and customer service takes care of them once they are customers. These groups should be talking regularly to gain insight into how they can help one another make the experience as smooth as possible. At FCR we are big fans of regular round table discussions in an effort to share more and more insight about customers with our clients.

Ask Your Customers

The best way to ask your customers about their experience is to survey them. At this point I’m less concerned about what survey you use and more concerned about getting regular customer feedback. Customer Satisfaction (CSAT), Net Promoter Score (NPS), or even the one with the happy and sad face are all great and inexpensive provided that you allow your customers to share feedback about their experience. The important part is routinely reading this feedback, following up, monitoring trends, and fixing issues.

It’s so easy to plop down in our chairs each day and only see the customer experience from our own point of view. Perhaps you think your customer experience is perfect–or perhaps you think you have an insurmountable problem. Regardless of what camp you are in, make it a routine to get out of your chair and view the customer experience from another seat. By gaining a new perspective, you may just find something you lost– whether you were looking for it or not.

Jeremy Watkin

Jeremy Watkin is the Head of Quality at GoFCR.com, the most disruptive and respected outsource provider. He has more than 15 years of experience as a customer service professional. He is also the co-founder and regular contributor on Communicate Better Blog. Jeremy has been recognized many times for his thought leadership. Follow him on Twitter and LinkedIn for more awesome customer service and experience insights.

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5 Tips for Getting Started with Twitter Marketing by Sheena White

Would you believe that as of the first quarter of 2015, Twitter was averaging 236 million monthly active users. That is 236 MILLION people! And yet, if I was to go ask most people on the street, they would probably say that they don’t “get” the point of the microblogging site. That, or they would tell me that their target demographic isn’t on the site.

As of the first quarter of 2015, Twitter was averaging 236 million monthly active users.

The truth is that Twitter users consist of a mix of both genders, primarily between the ages of 18 and 49. However, 22% of its users are over the age of 50. So unless you’re trying to market to seniors, chances are that your audience is on Twitter. The bigger problem isn’t that people aren’t on Twitter, it’s that many businesses don’t know what to do with the site. Check out my five tips for getting started with Twitter marketing.

Optimize your profile.

Whether you’re setting up your account for the first time or you have an account you created long ago, you need to make sure that your profile is optimized with the keywords you want people to find you for. This doesn’t mean you can’t show your sense of humor or share personal details about your values or hobbies. But you need to clearly state who you are and what you do (if you want people to find you on Twitter for those products and services).

Create a content strategy.

Let me first say that posting nonstop links and promotions on Twitter is not a good strategy if you want more followers. People don’t want to be “sold” to all the time and it makes you look like a spammer. I recommend creating “buckets” with TYPES of content that you want to share. For example: inspirational quotes, humor, blog posts, tips related to your niche, your free offer, etc. And make sure you include some images as part of that strategy, since they get 18% more clicks, 89% more favorites and 150% more retweets.

Have a plan for community building.

If you’re just getting started and have a very small community, you’ll want to start slowly, following just 25 people per day. Eventually you can grow to 100 although I don’t recommend more than that or you may find yourself on Twitter’s radar (you don’t want to get thrown in Twitter jail).

Where do you find people to follow?

Well, you definitely want to follow the right people or you won’t ever create a community of people interested in your products and services. You can start by following the people who follow your competitors. You can also do advanced keyword searches to find people according to the kinds of things they’re tweeting or find people who have certain keywords in their bios.

You don’t want to get thrown in Twitter jail.

Make sure that you have a following and unfollowing strategy in place as well. In other words, make sure you’re following and unfollowing people at least five days a week in order to keep your account growing, but make sure you don’t unfollow people so quickly that they don’t have the opportunity to follow you back (not everyone gets on Twitter daily). Rapidly following and unfollowing is actually referred to as churning followers and is something Twitter frowns upon.

If you don’t want to deal with the tedious task of manually growing your followers, you can automate it using tools like Manage Flitter or Social Quant.

Build lists.

There’s a lot of stuff in the newsfeed that you may never find relevant. List building, though, is a great way to cut the clutter. Create lists of great content producers whose content you can curate, of key influencers in your niche who you want to develop stronger relationships with, even leads for your business that you want to engage with more regularly. And don’t worry; you can make the lists private so there’s no fear in tipping off anyone that they’re on your list of prospects.

Engage!

Engagement is key to being successful on Twitter. Engaging really just means practicing good manners. Respond to people who @mention you. Thank people who retweet your content. Start conversations around common interests.

At the end of the day, Twitter is a social media network and you have to be sociable. You never know where the relationships you’re building on Twitter will take you and your business.

Are you on Twitter now? Do you love it or hate it? What are your biggest challenges? I would love to hear from you!

Sheena is a social media strategist and copywriter and is passionate about helping small businesses maximize the power of social media to increase the success of their online marketing efforts. Twitter @sheenamwhite

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