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Nice Guys Finish First? by Dara Goldberg

Last month, I had the pleasure of seeing Doug Sandler give a presentation at The Philips Collection. Doug has recently released a book, Nice Guys Finish First  about how to effectively build and maintain relationships. I have to admit, the title sounded intriguing, and so I decided not to skim through his book online and spoil the mini-seminar since I wanted to hear the author make his case in person. 

During his talk, Doug even pointed out that nothing he was saying was revolutionary. In fact, he said, everyone is already aware of most of his points, and even more importantly, they already know they should be following them. I thoroughly enjoy going to these types of talks as a refresher, to... well... keep myself sharp. Here is what I learned at this talk:

Note: Doug was speaking to a room full of sales and marketing executives -- apologies if sales or marketing is not your full time job -- but I believe this can be applicable to any industry!

We all know that communication is the key to relationships, and luckily for you, according to Doug, you're in more control than you think. When you're interacting with a client, you want to feel a human connection to that other person. People want to work with businesses focused on making an exceptional customer experience, rather than exceptional products. In order to get there, you need to connect with your customers, clients, prospects, or leads. The simplest interactions can deliver enriched, meaningful relationships; however, they can get botched by the silliest things.

The Five BIG Mistakes People Make:

  1. Failure to Listen
  2. Over Promising and Under Delivering
  3. Poor Response Time, i.e. replying to a text several days later (Why pay that forward? Don't be that person...)
  4. Failure to Have a System / Failure to be Consistent
  5. Failure to Care -- the Holy Grail of them all

OK, so all of the above are not easy habits to break. But you can turn all of this around, and position both yourself and your clients in a win/win situation. If you truly want to succeed, you will strive for leaving other people feeling good about themselves and thereby wanting a deeper more engaging relationship with you and your business. Don't forget that creating systems is very important for your daily operations, since it will build that trust and consistency that clients crave. Oh, and advising and educating your clients, rather than 'selling to your clients' will lead your client to better decisions.

'Go the extra mile, it's never crowded'

Doug asked us to take a Thirty Day Challenge, the Nice Guy’s Challenge. Here are the Nice Guy Rules:

  • Return Every Phone Call
  • Return Every Email
  • Deliver on Every Promise
  • Be on Time. Every Time
  • Send Two Messages a Day (texts or emails to two people you haven't spoken to in at least 3o days. Something quick, 'Hey, I'm thinking about you, and hope you're having a great day')

I’ve decided that December will be great month to do this. The theory behind this is to throw positivity into the universe like a handful of glitter. You get what you give, you know, the golden rule of the universe:

'Treat others as you would like to be treated'

As I said earlier, I believe anyone can benefit from this type of advice. I highly recommend Doug’s Podcast as well. I started listening to some of the episodes on my morning walks and I've been learning a lot of great tips to incorporate into my daily work.

About Dara Goldberg (in her own words):

I’m just a twenty-something woman, navigating her way through this strange, yet fascinating, adventure called life. I’m a sunshine, sand, and ocean loving  Florida girl, currently living in the heart of Washington, DC with my boyfriend, Alex. We have a house full of herbs, succulents, and cacti we are attempting to keep alive. Check out Dara's lifestyle blog at Peonies+Bees.


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But First, Let Me Take An (Un)Selfie by Miri Rodriguez

When Doug Sandler initially tweeted me to guest-write this blog, he gave me a few topic options: Entrepreneurship, Marketing or Customer Service. I thought, Great! I have so much to share on each of these subjects, I don’t even know which to choose? Then came a follow-up tweet: [Also] Give me your best quote on being a leader. Wait, what?

My mind started racing. LEADERSHIP? What can I say that somebody else hasn’t said already (much better than me)? What original excerpts have I posted that have gotten the most Likes or RTs? What’s for lunch? 

I went into overdrive, then suddenly drew a blank. Quickly checked my phone to see how much time I had before tweeting back and right before putting the phone down, received this text from one of my mentees:

If you treat an individual as he is, he will remain how he is. But if you treat him as if he were what he ought to be and could be, he will become what he ought to be and could be.” This is how you treat me.


And there it was. The most opportune reminder of what I believe good GREAT leaders (and leading brands) do: They take unselfies. That’s right. Remarkable leaders take time to showcase their most unselfish attributes…through others. They feature images of love, compassion, kindness and servanthood. They make it their first order of business to leave a selfless legacy. 

 



Leading brands can attribute much of their profitable success to taking unselfies. Organizations that make Corporate Citizenship a top priority are fruitful way beyond their bottom line because they’ve been able to turn both customers AND disadvantaged communities into fans. They also focus on providing a customized customer experience because they see people for who they ought to be: people.

I know this because I happen to work for a company that recently made Forbes Most Valuable Brands list, ranking at #1 in Customer Perception. It was also recognized by the Harvard Business Review for providing great customer service via social media channels. We get it. We take the focus off ourselves and put it back on who deserves it: our customers, our future generation, our legacy. Microsoft has donated over $1 billion to charitable organizations since it first began its Employee Giving Program, back in 1983. That’s a lot of unselfies!

Unselfies do more than capture a random act of kindness here and there. To true leaders and leading brands, unselfies are intentional leadership strategies that drive their every day. In a world increasingly growing with selfish motivation, unselfies help us stay noble and human. They remind us why we do what we do. If we are not genuinely serving others, if we are not helping people succeed, then what are we doing?

Last year a study estimated that over 1 million selfies were taken each day. That’s a lot of MEs. Don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against selfies. In fact, if you know me, you know I’m guilty of taking one (or two ☺)…but I often wonder, how wonderful our world would be if each of us flooded Instagram with unselfies too!  If for every selfie taken, TWO unselfies were posted. If you and I took twice the time and dedication to build other people up, as we take to build ourselves. If we shifted priorities, made it a point to go from good to GREAT leaders and first, took an unselfie.

Miri Rodriguez is the Social Media and Communities Lead for Microsoft Latin America. Her extensive career includes Marketing, Operations and Customer Experience. She is the mother of 2 boys and an American Bulldog. Her philanthropic work includes teaching middle school students at her local church, mentoring high school students at Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship and discipling young women into business leadership.


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The 7 Best Tactics to Handle Online Crisis by Lesya Liu

Social media is like a microscope all companies have to surrender themselves to. Most of the time nothing that happens online, stays online. Major PR flops get picked up by traditional media or become a focus of the real-world discussions.

Before you know it, a not-so-well-thought-through tweet gets you an unwanted attention. All of a sudden, people become angry at companies for saying something insensitive and here is where the real nightmare begins.

Don’t post anything right away – think first

It’s tempting to start posting something right away, whether it’d be an apology, explanation or defense. Resist this urge and think first. If you’re in the midst of PR crisis, it’s better to avoid any kind of quick-judgement actions that can further put you in disadvantage. Gather as many team members as possible and discuss the best course of action. The more heads you can put together, the better. This will give you different perspectives on what happened and possible reasons for it as well as on how to handle it.

While you’re developing a crisis management plan, don’t keep people waiting. Post something along the lines of “working on it” to show an audience and all affected groups that you’re aware of what’s happening and you’re trying to get to the bottom of an issue before jumping to self-defense.

Don’t engage in negative conversations

While the crisis is happening, there will be people and groups who will be very vocal in blaming your company and attacking it as a whole and/or individual employees. It’s best to not engage in these conversations and ignore them to the best of your ability. Two reasons for it: First of all, you might say something that will further worsen your position. Remember: don’t post anything on the first thought of it.

You’re also running a risk of continuing this conversation and further angering those people. You’re asking to be put in more hot water. If you really feel the need to respond and don’t leave people hanging, post a well-developed short message along the lines of showing your appreciation for their concern and stating that you’re working on a solution. Try not to get too into details while situation is not completely clear. Finally, if messages your company receives are simply rude, defamatory and threatening, block those individuals, flag their comments and don’t even dare to respond.

Investigate and keep people updated

While you’re trying to share information with the outside world, your back-end needs to work hard on investigation. If causes of public outrage are not clear (or not completely clear), your team needs to get to the bottom of things. Was something done by an employee or an individual associated with business? What are the reasons for the behavior in question? What groups were affected by these actions? How can you make it better now?

If investigation takes longer than expected, keep your audience posted on the progress. Don’t share everything just yet, but let them know that you care and didn’t just let it “fix itself.” Oftentimes, when a company makes a sincere effort at fixing an issue, public is more understanding, tolerant and their anger doesn’t persist.

Explain what happened

When investigation is completed, share a picture of what happened. Share your stance. This is not to say that you need to present a situation in a favorable for you light, but most of the actions have some kind of logic behind them. Explain that logic and why things developed the way they did. Transparency can bring trust back.

Acknowledge mistakes

If there is any fault on you (and there probably will be even if it’s minor), acknowledge mistake. It’s easier to apologize and move forward than to show your arrogance and lose customers and positive public perception. If you do acknowledge your mistake, try not to repeat in the future. Learn from this experience and become better. If a company has a whole history of the same type of offenses (or even different ones), it’s really difficult to gain any trust again; and slowly but surely a company can simply be dissolved.

Work on enhancing a positive image

Now that the crisis is quieting down, it’s time to highlight your positive attributes and enhance positive image. This can be done by fixing the mistake, helping out groups that were affected or just being a better part of your community in general. Yet, there is a fine line between trying to get back on track and enhance your positive image versus being overly-promotional and too active with PR efforts. Make it meaningful, not flashy.

Document processes, details for future

Once the crisis is over, make sure your team documents everything that happened in this particular situation, what measures were taken, what processes were developed. Create a crisis management plan for the future, if you don’t have one yet. This will help you be better prepared next time (if it will happen) and make you more resilient to crisis in the future.

Have you managed a crisis before? Do you have a well-documented plan in place in case it happens? Share in the comment section below.

Lesya Liu is a blogger at The Social Media Current (thesocialmediacurrent.com), a photographer and a social media expert. Her passion lies in art and marketing (and combining the two). You can find her on Twitter: @LesyaLiu.

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