Post #4 Tools, Tips, Tricks: Buddha's Diet


Today's tool, tip and trick have been inspired by Dan Zigmond, co-author of Buddha's Diet, The Ancient Art of Losing Weight Without Losing Your Mind. I bet you didn't know that Buddha was a skinny guy. Although thin, he tried dieting and didn't like it any more than you do. The instructions he gave his monks over 2,000 years ago were fairly simple and are shared below with a somewhat modern spin. 

Tool: Zero -- Fasting Tracker (before fasting, always consult your doctor). Research shows that it is not just what you eat, but when you eat that is important. Zero, available in the iTunes app store, is an app designed to help you fast. Far different, and much healthier, than starving yourself, intermittent fasting helps you lose weight, decreases risk of certain types of cancer, improves sleep, regulates blood sugar levels, systemic inflammation and regulates aging biomarkers. Check out Zero for more specifics.

Tip: Replace mindless eating with mindful eating -- Many of us mindlessly eat during the day, having breakfast on the go, eating lunch at our desk and driving through fast food with the kids for dinner. All of this, so we can manage our time, keep up with our responsibilities and fill the void in our tummies. If we focus on how we eat, and what we are eating, we will eat slower, eat less and eat healthier.

Trick: Limit eating to a 12 hour window.  Modern times have greatly outpaced our "lizard" bodies. Although our hearts, lungs and many other organs are designed to work 24 hours a day, our metabolism is just not designed to keep that pace. Modern food engineering, just the opposite, is designed to make us want more, more, more. We run our metabolism hard and it affects our weight, health and chemistry.  Although Buddha lived before the age of french fries, doughnuts and potato chips, his teachings helped many people live a happier, healthier and more fulfilled life, providing lessons and wisdom many centuries old. Regarding eating, he was specific about his rules of "untimely eating." Buddha cared less about what his monk ate, and more about when they ate it. If you limit your eating to 12 hours and strictly follow this rule you will take much of your "after hours" snacking out of your life. 

If you want to hear more from Dan Zigmond book plus fascinating information about his position as Facebook's Director of Analytics, I interview him on The Nice Guys on Business podcast. The interview is airing soon. For an automatic download of Dan's interview and notification when it comes out, subscribe to The Nice Guys today.

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